Home is everywhere

By December 5, 2016My Blog

I’m sitting on the plane in midair, somewhere in between UK and UAE en route South Africa. My thoughts are flowing.

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I have started to think that patriotism as beautiful as it is may seem can blind us from many things. Like the fact that us humans all have this opportunity to live on this one earth that belongs to none of us and our duty is to ensure that we leave it how we found it or “better” for future people to have the same opportunity. 

The earth is our home and it’s our duty to work together to look after it. Home is everywhere where there is love, community and respect. 

Spending the last few months traveling I have felt at home everywhere I have been. And have realized that perhaps “excessive patriotism” merely reinforces our differences and separateness, and creates this “competition” between us. For me, the less competitive we are, and the more cooperative, the better. 

What will it take for us to realize that we are all just humans co-existing on this planet? And our role is not to see how much we can take and then protect what we have at all costs, but it’s to see how much we can give, share and minimize our collective weight.

Language, appearance and religion have become major “points of difference” that are supposedly stopping us from being able to live in harmony. I believe there is something that supersedes all of these, and that’s the language of kindness, compassion and generosity that exists in everyone of us when we are born and can be felt through the touch of a hand or the look in an eye or an act of kindness. That moment when we realize our “shared humanness”. We are taught language, we are taught to “fear” differences in appearance and we are taught religion. A child is not born seeing colour. A child is not born fluent in verbal language. A child is not born knowing religion.

We all know that feeling of “being away from home”. It needn’t be far. Ever. All we need to do is breathe in deeply the air we are surrounded by and we will realize our interdependence and just how important air is to us all. And that we are home. No matter where we are. 

I am because you are!

What does “home” mean to you? Would love you to share your feelings! 

Something beautiful to end off from Mark Twain:

“Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see” 

Bodhi

About Bodhi

In conventional speak, John McInroy is a South-African born social activist, humanitarian, social entrepreneur, ultra endurance athlete, international field hockey player, actor and vegan yogi. In more authentic terms, Bodhi is a human you may see walking the streets barefoot trying to find new ways to tread as lightly as possible.

5 Comments

  • Mechi says:

    Hola! Once you live ina different country you become part of everywhere and nowhere! Sometimes a bit difficult to grasp… for us Latin people home is where family is. We can’t ignore the power of language and culture either. I need and miss my language and culture, but get very inspired and stimulated to meet other cultures and learn from them. Very interesting! Tolerance, respect and love can make us accept each other, and live together while at the same time embrace our uniqueness, what makes us special as an individual or culture. Uff Hours of discussion about this topic! Besos!

  • Coen says:

    For many years I had a green suitcase as my home. It was one of my few possessions. We traveled all over the world and had many homes. I packed and unpacked it countless times, feeling at home immediately when I opened it. It represented independence and freedom to explore opportunities anywhere on the globe. It has taught me that home is where you choose you want to be, where you feel at ease and where you can fulfil your dreams. Home is universal.

  • John says:

    Thanks so much Coen & Mechi! So nice to hear from you both!

  • christine brooks says:

    “home is where your heart is” comes to mind.
    yiur words are beautifully written

  • Yes something I’ve thought a lot about as well as an expat. Maybe it’s a feeling of attachment; of comfort, of preference? Sort of like love and friendship in general. I think it would be very difficult to remove human preference from our brains…unless we really master the art of detachment.

    Do we want to be detached though?

    These are difficult questions…

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